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. that got law enforcement zeroing on the two brothers. bill: mike, we're trying to piece this together as best we can but what can you tell us about the reports that the fbi is questioning him today from his hospital bed? >> reporter: all of that goes back to a "usa today" report citing anonymous sources. the sourcing is not as tight as i would like but certainly a significant development. we know he has been sedated. he has a injury to his neck or jaw, a bullet wound to his neck or jaw that prevented him from communicating. 9 report says he was roused back to consciousness and providing things in writing and providing substantive answers to questions. we know from the information he is providing that indicates there is not a larger network and not a second wave of bombings to be feared, bill. bill: mike, thank you. we'll be back with you when there are more headlines from boston. mike leading our coverage there martha. martha: we are hearing the police chatter when police first spotted dzhokhar tsarnaev hiding in that covered boat. massachusetts state police released the stunning infr
in boston as an scuse because our law toughens i think things up. >> the senate bill would have multiple background chengs and make sure anyone over-staying a visa would be detected. right now, there is no check on airport departures. as for those who came without visas, lindsay graham says this. >> now is the time to bring all the 11 million out of the shadows and find out who they are. most of them are here to work. but wree may find some terrorists in our midst who, have been hiding in the shadows, when it comes to the entry/exit. the 19 hijackers were all student who is overstayed their visas and the system didn't capture that. >> the senate holds the second two of hearings on immigration reform tomorrow. >> it will be very interesting. an emotional ballgame in beston last night, after a week of terror. >> shannon: a yesterday's home game was made more special by neil diamond, who made it there on the red-eye. members of law enforcement, first responders and marathon participants were also honored. david ortiz had a passionate rally cry. >> it doesn't say red sox, it says boston... w
the suspect is. i mean, no shortage of police here. it's incredible the amount of law enforcement presence that is here to watch this, what appears to be final act play out. >> yeah. that's right. it's incredible because we are outside the perimeter that was searched all day long. i mean those 20 blocks in watertown and cambridge that he we were telling you about all day long. that was over this direction. but this is over here. so, if he was here all day he was outside the perimeter where the police have been searching for him all day long. i find that really interesting. right after the 5:30 press conference that where the state police said well we didn't get him, we're going to start pulling things back, almost immediately, i'm talking like within half an hour, we hear the gunfire and then everything starts erupting over here in this direction. now, we did have a camerthat we moment that those explosions were going off, and we hope to be able to turn that around for you fairly quickly. we had to move our live truck. we had to move all kinds of things, folks so please bear with us. we ar
will prosecute this terrorist through our civil system of justice. underu.s. law, the united states citizens can not be tried rather in military commissions. martha: but house armed services commission buck mckeown argues that the white house should reconsider. he says, quote, it seems premature to declare that we will not treat tsarnaev as an enemy combatant since we don't know about his affiliations. clearly american citizens must be tried to civilian court, but the same citizen viciously attacked his countrymen, should be exploited for his intelligence value before any trial begins. that will be a debate that rages on for some time on this issue. we'll talk more later in the show with former new york city mayor rudy giuliani. bill: looking forward to that coming up here. meanwhile the feds want to talk to the widow of the suspect, tamerlan. she is mother of 3-year-old daughter between the two. the her lawyer said talks are underway with the feds how to proceed with that. he revealed on the last day tamerlan was home when his wife left for work. martha: well the officers who capturedded dzhokh
, to the legal process ahead of us. with me former united states attorney general the nation's chief law enforcement officer michael mukasey who is chief judge in the southern district of new york and presided over the blind sheik trial and the jose padilla case. we heard that there will be no charges filed against the younger brother dhokhar. how long can the justice department wait to file charges? >> they can wait really as long as they like. the fact is that he -- the only down side for them is the possibility that any statement that he makes might not be able to be used at trial. but they have got so much evidence including his own confession to the person whose car he carjacked that the likelihood that they need any statement from him as evidence in the trial is remote. >> judge jeanine: and you know, judge, a lot of people have been talking about miranda and the public safety exception. i don't want to spend a lot of time on that. when the police announced that the public threat was over, once dhokhar was taken into custody, then, you know, doesn't that suggest that the public saf
process ahead of us. with a former united states attorney general, the nation's chief law enforcement officer, michael mukasey, who was chief judge in the southern district of new york, presided over the blind sheik trial as well as the jose padilla case. good evening, judge. >> good evening, judge. >> good to have you back, judge. >> today we heard there will be no charges filed against the younger brother dzhokhar. how long can the justice department wait to file charges? >> they can wait really as long as they'd like. the fact is that he -- the only down side for them is the possibility that any statement that he makes might not be able to be used at trial. they've got so much evidence, including his own confession to the person whose car he carjacked, that the likely they need any statement from him as evidence in the trial is remote. >> right. you know, judge, a lot of people h ve been talking about miranda, the public safety exception. i don't want to spend a lot of time on that. but, you know, when the police announced that the public threat was over, once dzhokhar was taken in
is cooperating. >> the reports of involvement by her husband and brother-in-law came as an absolute shock to them all. as a mother, a sister, a daughter, a wife, katy deeply mourns the pain and loss to innocent victims. >> shepard: we're learning more about her husband's trip to russia and whether it set off alarm bells in the united states. >> the hearing this morning created more confusion over the fbi's handling of tamerlan tsarnaev in 2011 and which federal agency new about his trip the following 'er to russia. >> was your department aware of his travels to russia, and if you weren't, the reason. >> the travel in 2012 you're referring to, yes, the system pinged when he was leaving the united states. by the time he returned, all investigations had been -- the matter had been closed. >> but napolitano's statements chronic with what assistant fbi briefed another lawmaker who is a member of the judiciary committee. >> the fbi told me they had no knowledge of him leaving or coming back. the name was misspelled so i would like to talk to you more about this case. how this man left. where he went, a
as the law enforcement officers streamed out of the community following the capture of the suspect. the vigil gave the residents a chance to gather together and thank the officers that strive to keep them safe. tucker, aly, clayton? >> tucker: thank you. >> clayton: we have an interesting picture this morning, of what it was like to live in this home. this mother raising these two children there in this family, also their daughter. this comes to us this morning from alyssa kilzer, 23-year-old who used to go to their mom's house, a is a lan, spa. >> alisyn: sort of. >> clayton: if you call it that. she used to run a day spa. moved it to her home. people would come to your home. you are around the family on a regular basis. she went there to get facials and beauty treatments for five or six years. >> alisyn: yes. >> tucker: it's chaotic home. filled with the sounds of arguing and food cooking. and clothes all over the place. she describes a family that became increasingly religious over the years that she -- >> clayton: radical. >> tucker: exactly. >> alisyn: the boston bombers had two sisters.
of the establishment. look at aljer hiss. he was a supreme court court. his brother was a law partner. how could he be a communist spy? yet, he was. terrorists can learn that lesson. the best way to avoid scrutiny is to look like you fit in. >> we just had anna chatman, remember her, the sexy russian spy who is moscow and putin gave her an award. you raise a point about letting him back into the country, not just the first time but last year when he came back from russia. has there been an unfortunate pattern of that? egypt didn't want theli sheikh. he's convicted of being the leader of the cell that went to attack the world trade center in 1993 and plot the bombing of landmarks. he's a notorious convicted international terrorist. where is the gap? where are the holes? have we made mistakes? >> i think there are a lot of holes in our immigration system. look. i speak as someone who favors more legal immigration, but i can tell you. when i was at the justice department in the 1980s, fbi agents came and told me there were 10,000 iranian graduate students in the country and they weren't studying engli
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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